Your super checklist for EOFY

The lead up to 30 June can be a good time to maximise tax benefits that may be available to you inside super.

Certain contributions, which we cover below, may have the ability to reduce your taxable income, or see you pay less on investment earnings.

Contributions that could create tax benefits:

  1. Tax-deductible super contributions

You may be able to claim a tax deduction on after-tax super contributions you’ve made, or make, before 30 June this year.

To claim a tax deduction on these contributions, you’ll need to tell your super fund by filling out a ‘notice of intent’ form. You’ll generally need to lodge this notice and have the lodgement acknowledged by your fund, before you file a tax return for the year you made the contributions.

Putting money into super and claiming it as a tax deduction may be of particular benefit if you receive some extra income that you’d otherwise pay tax on at your personal income tax rate (as this is often higher).

Similarly, if you’ve sold an asset that you have to pay capital gains tax on, you may decide to contribute some or all of that money into super, so you can claim it as a tax deduction. This could reduce or at least offset the capital gains tax that’s owing.

  1. Government co-contributions

If you’re a low to middle-income earner and have made (or decide to make before 1 July 2022) an after-tax contribution to your super account, which you don’t claim a tax deduction for, you might be eligible for a government co contribution of up to $500.

If your total income is equal to or less than $41,112 in the 2021/22 financial year and you make after-tax contributions of $1,000 to your super fund, you’ll receive the maximum co-contribution of $500.

If your total income is between $41,112 and $56,112 in the 2021/22 financial year, your maximum entitlement will reduce progressively as your income rises.

If your income is equal to or greater than the higher income threshold $56,112 in the 2021/22 financial year, you won’t receive any co-contribution.

Also, you’ll generally need to have at least 10% of your assessable income coming from employment/business sources to qualify.

  1. Spouse contributions

If you’re earning more than your partner and would like to top up their retirement savings, or vice versa, you may want to think about making spouse contributions.

If eligible, you can generally make a contribution to your spouse’s super and claim an 18% tax offset on up to $3,000 through your tax return.

To be eligible for the maximum tax offset, which works out to be $540, you need to contribute a minimum of $3,000 and your partner’s annual income needs to be $37,000 or less.

If their income exceeds $37,000, you’re still eligible for a partial offset. However, once their income reaches $40,000, you’ll no longer be eligible for the offset, but can still make contributions on their behalf.

  1. Salary sacrifice contributions

Salary sacrifice is where you choose to have some of your before-tax income paid into your super by your employer on top of what they might pay you under the superannuation guarantee.

Salary sacrifice contributions (like tax-deductible contributions) are a type of concessional contribution and these are usually taxed at 15% (or 30% if your total income exceeds $250,000), which for most, means you’ll generally pay less tax on your super contributions than you do on your income.

If you’re in a financial position to set up a salary sacrifice arrangement, you may want to do this before the start of the new financial year, so talk to your employer or payroll division to have the arrangement documented.

Important things to consider

Contributions need to be received by your super fund on time (ie, before 30 June) if you’re planning on claiming a tax deduction or obtaining other government concessions on certain contributions when you do your tax return.

There are limits on how much you can contribute. If you exceed super contribution caps, additional tax and penalties may apply. Read more about super contribution types, limits and benefits.

Currently, if you’re aged 67 to 75 and wanting to make voluntary contributions, a work test applies unless you meet an exemption. Changes to the work test are coming more on this below.

The government sets general rules around when you can access your super, which typically won’t be until you reach your preservation age and meet a condition of release, such as retirement.

 

Source: AMP

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